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Regular and Premium Gas Prices

Regular and Premium Gas Prices: Why do They Change at Different Rates?

Everyone knows that the different octane levels means different pricing. However, many people write in regarding the fact that Regular and Premium gas prices often change at different rates. Why does this happen, and what distinguishes their pricing models? Generally this is due to differences in their production costs, demand and supply dynamics, regulatory impacts, and seasonal variations. Understanding these factors can help explain the diverging prices of these two types of gas. Different Production Costs: The production costs of Regular and Premium gasoline are different due to their varying octane levels. Premium gasoline, with its higher octane level, is more expensive to refine, store, and distribute. These costs are reflected in its price, which can fluctuate based on changes in these underlying costs. Demand and Availability: Regular and Premium gasoline have different demand and supply dynamics. Premium gasoline is typically used by high-performance engines, so changes in the market for these vehicles can affect its price. On the other hand, Regular gasoline is more commonly used, so its price is more sensitive to broader economic factors, such as changes in crude oil prices. Regulations: Regulatory factors can also have differential impacts onRegular and Premium Gas Prices. For instance, environmental […]

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Motor Vehicle Fuel Sales in Canada: An Overview

Motor vehicle fuel sales in Canada have witnessed significant fluctuations over the past few years. From pandemic-induced declines to gradual recoveries, the landscape of fuel consumption reflects broader economic and social trends. In this blog post, we delve into the recent data on gasoline and diesel sales, breaking down yearly and daily totals based on reports from Statistics Canada. Gross Sales of Gasoline 2022 Highlights Regional Trends Net Sales of Diesel 2022 Insights Regional Variations Conclusion Motor vehicle fuel sales in Canada reflect a dynamic interplay of economic factors, travel behavior, and environmental consciousness. As the world transitions toward cleaner energy sources, monitoring these trends becomes crucial. Whether you’re a road-trip enthusiast or a business owner, understanding fuel consumption patterns helps shape our collective future. For more detailed data and official reports, visit the Statistics Canada website. Stay informed, drive responsibly, and let’s navigate the road ahead together.

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Gas Prices Rise in the Spring

Why do Gas Prices Rise in the Spring?

As the summer season approaches, many Canadians are gearing up for road trips and outdoor adventures. But with the warmer weather also comes an increase in gasoline prices. So, just why do gas prices rise in the spring? RVP Season One of the many reasons this happens is due to a phenomenon known as the RVP season. RVP stands for Reid Vapor Pressure, which is a measure of how quickly gasoline evaporates. During the summer months, the RVP of gasoline is required to be lower in order to reduce air pollution. This means that refineries have to produce a different blend of gasoline, which can be more expensive to make. As a result, the prices of gasoline tend to rise during the RVP season, which typically runs from June 1st to September 15th in Canada. This is because the demand for the summer blend of gasoline increases, while the supply may be limited. Save Money on Gas But don’t worry, there are ways to save money on gas during this time. One option is to plan your trips and errands efficiently, combining multiple stops into one trip to reduce the amount of gas you use. You can also consider carpooling

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Global Fuel Supply

Global Fuel Supply Outlook- Fall 2023

As we approach the fall of 2023, the global fuel supply is facing a critical situation. The demand for fuel has been steadily increasing over the years, driven by the growing population and the rise of developing countries. However, the supply of fuel has not been able to keep up with this demand, leading to a potential crisis in the near future. Fossil Fuel Reserves One of the major factors contributing to this situation is the depletion of fossil fuel reserves. Fossil fuels, such as oil and gas, have been the primary sources of energy for decades. However, these resources are finite and are being consumed at an alarming rate. According to a report by the International Energy Agency, the world’s oil reserves are expected to last only for the next 50 years, while gas reserves may last for another 60 years. This means that if we continue to rely on fossil fuels, we will soon face a shortage of these resources. Politics Another factor affecting the global fuel supply is the political instability in some of the major oil-producing countries. Conflicts and tensions in the Middle East, which is home to some of the world’s largest oil reserves, have

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Better gas mileage

Get Better Mileage

Gas prices are constantly fluctuating and it can be frustrating to spend so much money on fuel. Fortunately, there are several ways to improve your car’s gas mileage and save money in the long run. In addition to the Gas Mileage Tips mentioned in our previous post, here are a few more tips to help you get the most out of your gas tank. Keep Your Car Light The heavier your car is, the more fuel it requires to move. This means you should remove any excess weight from your car, such as heavy objects in the trunk or roof racks that are not in use. Every 100 pounds of extra weight can reduce your fuel efficiency by up to 2 percent. So, if you’re carrying around unnecessary items, it’s time to clean out your car and lighten the load. Use Cruise Control Driving at a constant speed is more fuel-efficient than constantly accelerating and decelerating. By using cruise control on the highway, you can maintain a consistent speed and save on fuel. This is especially helpful during long road trips, as it reduces the amount of times you need to brake and accelerate. Avoid Idling Idling is a huge

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Two weeks in to a 25% carbon tax increase – and the hurt keeps building

Here we are two weeks into a $50 dollar a ton Trudeau-Singh carbon tax – almost another 10 cents/litre on average for Canadians at the pumps Yes, this Trudeau-Singh increase applies only to the Prairies, Ontario and New Brunswick, but BC’s NDP government just whacked that province with its own massive carbon tax increase. And shortly, most Canadians will soon get their next monthly round bills: electricity and natural gas and propane and heating oil.  All of these will be higher too.   It will also show (again) in higher grocery bills (have you checked the price of a pound of butter lately?)  And of course, it will show in the price of every other consumer good, and everything else. Why? Because affordable energy is the core competitive advantage of everything we do in Canadian society: the cost of everything reflects the cost of producing and transporting that thing, and the cost of producing and transporting that thing incurs energy costs.  And ultimately, you and I have to pay for it.  No amount of token rebates addresses that – the tax grows faster than the rebate cheques.  And the Trudeau-Singh alliance is destroying that core competitive advantage, by raising the cost

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One week in to a 25% carbon tax increase – and the hurt keeps building

Here we are one week into a $50 dollar a ton Trudeau-Singh carbon tax – almost another 10 cents/litre on average for Canadians at the pumps!   And shortly we will all get our next monthly round bills: electricity and natural gas and propane and heating oil. All of these will be higher too.   It will also show (again) in higher grocery bills (have you checked the price of a pound of butter lately?)  And of course, it will show in the price of every other consumer good, and everything else. Why? Because affordable energy is the core competitive advantage of everything we do in Canadian society: the cost of everything reflects the cost of producing and transporting that thing, and the cost of producing and transporting that thing incurs energy costs.  And ultimately, you and I have to pay for it. No amount of token rebates addresses that – the tax grows faster than the rebate cheques.  And the Trudeau-Singh alliance is destroying that core competitive advantage, by raising the cost of energy, that in turn raises the cost of everything else. Despite what Justin Trudeau, Jagmeet Singh and their fellow green cultists say, energy use is not a bad

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Trudeau’s Emission Reduction Plan: Uncertainty, More Taxes, and Nothing to Help a Dangerous World

As Vladimir Putin wreaks havoc in Ukraine, he rests confident knowing that Canada – one of the world’s most energy-rich nations – remains utterly incapable of doing anything to reduce Europe’s dependence on Russian oil and gas. The Europeans are, after all, the bank for Putin’s military aggression. Europe needs Russian oil and gas and they have no other plausible supplier in sight. In a slightly different world, Canada would have been in a terrific position to supply Europe with an alternative supply of oil and gas. But, because once upon a time, Justin Trudeau discovered that it was “2015” and Harper was out and he was in, the Trudeau Liberals declared war on Canada’s oil and gas industry.  Canada’s own war on oil and gas – and the Canadian consumer – entered a new phase this week.  Canada Environment Minister Stephen Guilbeault tabled the Government of Canada’s “Emission Reduction Plan” yesterday (March 29) in the House of Commons (2030 Emissions Reduction Plan – Canada’s Next Steps for Clean Air and a Strong Economy – Canada.ca) This Emission Reduction Plan,” or “ERP,” is intended to detail how the new Trudeau-Singh government will reduce greenhouse gas emissions to a level that is 40-45% below

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